wrap me in galaxy
  • ancient-bones
pyrrhiccomedy:


Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.
Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.
So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)
Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.
This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 
Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?
By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.
Sources: 1 2 3

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

(Source: wasbella102)

ohioisloko:

K SO I’M HAVING A HUGE GIVEAWAY.


it includes (not in order from pictures) ;

  • Abandon All Ships skull w/ candles shirt
  • Sleeping With Sirens zombie shirt
  • Asking Alexandria green letters with band members shirt
  • Kitten concert shirt including signature of lead singer
  • Asking Alexandria goo monster chasing man shirt
  • Asking Alexandria birds and wolf white and green shirt
  • Sleeping With Sirens human heart shirt
  • Pierce the Veil mint green monster in corner shirt
  • Bring Me the Horizon skull and eagles shirt
  • Of Mice and Men shirt with “OG LOKO” lyrics making out & logo and “this is faithfullness at its finest” on the back
  • Falling In Reverse shirt blue and purple
  • Pierce The Veil band members shirt
  • Grateful Dead shirt
  • Of Mice and Men shirt from concert w/ flowers making logo
  • Pierce the veil shirt (ptv looks like mtv logo)
  • Jack Barakat, Kellin Quinn, Austin Carlile, and Vic Fuentes tile shirt one of a kind
  • My Chemical Romance comic strip shirt
  • John Lennon shirt
  • Pierce the veil collide with the sky concert shirt
  • Sleeping with sirens shirt
  • Pierce The veil cartoon skeleton band members baseball shirt
  • pierce the veil band members tshirt
  • Of Mice and Men hoodie pull-over black and orange
  • Sleeping With Sirens red concert shorts
  • Sleeping with sirens acoustic ep album cover poster
  • kellin quinn and vic fuentes in front of flag poster
  • pierce the veil concert poster
  • of mice and men photo signed by all band members
  • Grateful dead official dead head way product
  • of mice and men poster
  • leg lamp from a Christmas story (the movie)
  • KITTEN poster signed by all band memers
  • Kellin quinn poster from ap magazine
  • Supernatural season 7 brand new
  • Spider Man mirror
  • Of mice and Men (the flood) two disk special CD
  • My Chemical Romance the black parade CD
  • My chemical romance three cheers for sweet revenge CD
  • Sleeping With Sirens Lets Cheers to This CD
  • All Time low don’t panic CD
  • Alice in chains black gives way to blue CD
  • Kitten concert set list CD
  • Sleeping with sirens with ears to see and eyes to hear CD
  • My Chemical Romance three disk special life on the murder scene live, backstage videos, and music videos
  • Evanescence anywhere but home two disk special including album songs and backstage videos/music videos/ live performances
  • evanescence the open door CD
  • Asking Alexandria reckless and relentless CD
  • Asking Alexandria stand up and scream CD
  • All time low nothing personal CD
  • all time low dirty work CD
  • sleeping with sirens if you were a movie this would be your soundtrack acoustic ep CD
  • all time low mtv unplugged double disk set with life songs CD and performance videos
  • Pierce The Veil collide with the sky CD
  • pierce the veil selfish machines CD
  • Evanescence bring me to life CD
  • paramore All we know is falling CD
  • All American Rejects CD
  • all time low so wrong, it’s right cd

ALSO INCLUDED BUT NOT SHOWN:

  • Pierce the veil grey crewneck from concert (can be found on merch now)
  • capture the crown concert baseball shirt on back says “till death”
  • paramore long sleeve shirt w/ skulls and roses
  • sleeping with sirens black and orange shirt
  • grey and black we came as romans shirt

TO WIN THE THINGS IN THIS GIVEAWAY, REBLOG IT. YES THE MORE YOU REBLOG THE BETTER CHANCE YOU WILL GET TO WIN THE GIVEAWAY, BUT TRY NOT TO BUG YOUR FOLLOWERS TOO MUCH. I WILL USE A RANDOM GENERATOR TO PICK A WINNER ON JUNE 1ST. YOU MUST BE FOLLOWING ME (OHIOISLOKO) AND YES, I WILL CHECK. IF YOU ARE PICKED AND ARE NOT FOLLOWING ME, I WILL PICK SOMEONE ELSE. INBOX ME FOR ANY FURTHER QUESTIONS, REBLOG AND FOLLOW, AND GOOD LUCK!

blacklightrevolution:

The Bubble Nebula…a dark star

blacklightrevolution:

The Bubble Nebula…a dark star

The Pinwheel Galaxy
This image of the Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as M101, combines data in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet and X-rays from four of NASA’s space-based telescopes. This multi-spectral view shows that both young and old stars are evenly distributed along M101’s tightly-wound spiral arms. Such composite images allow astronomers to see how features in one part of the spectrum match up with those seen in other parts. It is like seeing with a regular camera, an ultraviolet camera, night-vision goggles and X-ray vision, all at the same time.The Pinwheel Galaxy is in the constellation of Ursa Major (also known as the Big Dipper). It is about 70 percent larger than our own Milky Way Galaxy, with a diameter of about 170,000 light years, and sits at a distance of 21 million light years from Earth. This means that the light we’re seeing in this image left the Pinwheel Galaxy about 21 million years ago - many millions of years before humans ever walked the Earth.Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; IR & UV: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Optical: NASA/STScI
The Pinwheel Galaxy

This image of the Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as M101, combines data in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet and X-rays from four of NASA’s space-based telescopes. This multi-spectral view shows that both young and old stars are evenly distributed along M101’s tightly-wound spiral arms. Such composite images allow astronomers to see how features in one part of the spectrum match up with those seen in other parts. It is like seeing with a regular camera, an ultraviolet camera, night-vision goggles and X-ray vision, all at the same time.

The Pinwheel Galaxy is in the constellation of Ursa Major (also known as the Big Dipper). It is about 70 percent larger than our own Milky Way Galaxy, with a diameter of about 170,000 light years, and sits at a distance of 21 million light years from Earth. This means that the light we’re seeing in this image left the Pinwheel Galaxy about 21 million years ago - many millions of years before humans ever walked the Earth.

Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; IR & UV: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Optical: NASA/STScI

space-nshit:

NGC 6188.

space-nshit:

NGC 6188.